About Us


The Arborway Committee for Public Transit, Inc is a volunteer group of residents and merchants of Boston that advocates for quality public transit in the urban environment. Founded in 1976 our chief objective has been to advocate for Jamaica Plain's one seat ride into the central subway system, currently referred to as Boston's E-Line, a branch of the Green Line.

We are also a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization with a mission to educate and inform decision makers on the benefits of public transportation. We sponsor a number of community discussion meetings in Jamaica Plain and the city at large.

How can you help? Donate or follow us on Twitter or Facebook for news, information and opinion on Boston transportation. See our Support page for more information.


Board of Directors



Marcus Baker is a local university student studying Economics at Suffolk University. Coming from a rural environment, Marcus sees transit as a liberation from the automobile and as an efficient and equitable way to move residents, commuters, and tourists in an urban setting. He holds a deep interest in urban design and planning, hoping to use that interest to benefit the community in which he lives, works, and learns. Marcus also oversees and maintains the ACPT, Inc.’s online presence via arborway.org and social media, including Twitter, Facebook, and change.org.


Kevin F. Moloney (Treasurer) of Jamaica Plain is a graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard College and Boston College Law School. He served as First Assistant Corporation for the City of Boston when Kevin White was Mayor. Thereafter, he was a civil litigation partner in the Boston law firm Barron & Stadfeld, P.C. from which he retired in December 2011. Appointed by Mayor Flynn to the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library, he served as president of the trustees from 1984-1990. Thereafter, he was an elected member of the Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Council, including four years as Chair. A trustee for many years of Jamaica Plain's Eliot School, he was treasurer and later president of the trustees. A founding member of the board of directors of the ACPT, in 2013 he was elected again to the JP Neighborhood Council. Re-elected in 2016, he currently serves as JPNC Chair.


Dr. Srdjan S. Nedeljkovic, originally from Serbia, where he spent some of his childhood feet away from a railroad with thunderous coal-fired steam locomotives passing by, he lives in Newton Highlands. He and his wife and children are all too frequent riders on the MBTA. Active in the community, Dr. Nedeljkovic is the President of the Newton Highlands Neighborhood Area Council. He also serves on the Newton Transportation Advisory Group and is on the Board of Directors of the Crystal Lake Conservancy. As a member of Bike Newton, he is an advocate for promoting safe bicycling as well as transit. Dr. Nedeljkovic is faculty in the Department of Anesthesiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where he is Fellowship Director of the Pain Medicine program and an Associate Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School. He studied at Penn State University and is a graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, often riding on the streetcar line between Center City and Chestnut Hill once upon a time.


Michael Reiskind is a long-time resident of Jamaica Plain involved in improving the Arborway corridor since 1977. He is presently on the Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Council and chairs its Public Service Committee, working on public safety, public works, and transportation issues. A board member of JP Centre/South Main Streets, the Jamaica Pond Association, and the JP Business & Professional Association, he is active in many aspects of the community. Mr. Reiskind is an early advocate of Neighborhood Policing and works in collaboration with the Boston Police Department on its implementation in Jamaica Plain.


Franklyn P. Salimbene (Chair) is Senior Lecturer in Law at Bentley University. He has been actively engaged in the Jamaica Plain community for many years. During that time he has served on the Board of Directors of the Jamaica Pond Association and the Jamaica Plain Symphony, as well as the Arborway Committee for Public Transit. He has also served on the Vestry of St. John’s Episcopal Church. During the 1990s and early 2000s, he prepared and delivered testimony at numerous DEP and DOT hearings supporting Green Line service to Jamaica Plain, opposing, MBTA fare increases, and other transit-related issues. He recently published a paper in the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy (Spring 2017) on the topic of streetcars and bicycles in the new urban environment.


Alan Smith Soto (Clerk), a long time resident of Jamaica Plain, was born in San José, Costa Rica, and lived in Madrid many years. He received his B.A. from the University of Maryland, and the A.M. and Ph. D. from Harvard University. He is professor of Spanish at Boston University and has taught and studied the works of various authors, including Galdós, Lorca, Cervantes and César Vallejo; his interests also include contemporary Spanish poetry, and the theory of aesthetics in literature and the plastic arts. An author of two books of poetry, Fragmentos de alcancía (Cambridge: Asaltoalcielo editores, 1998) and Libro del lago (Madrid: Árdora Ediciones, 2014), he is a member of the Jamaica Pond Poets.


Karen O. Wepsic was born in Brooklyn, New York and rode trolleys everywhere. She holds a Ph.D. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University and has been a long time advocate for public transportation. She is on the MBTA Rider Oversight Committee and represents the ACPT, Inc. in the On The Move Transit Coalition. She rides the MBTA bus route 39 every day and consider it a poor substitute for light rail in frequency of service, quality of the ride, crowdedness, schedule adherence and lack of connection to the MBTA core.


George P. Zoulalian moved to Jamaica Plain as a graduate student in 1972 and has worked with fellow residents on several transit-related projects and committees, including the Southwest Corridor, the Community Planning Committee for the Arborway Yard (CCPAY), and the Arborway Rail Restoration Project Advisory Committee (ARRPAC). He later was a plaintiff in a suit to force the State to restore Green Line service to Jamaica Plain. He now serves on the Design Advisory Group (DAG) for the Casey Arborway project as a voice for transit riders.